Donations for 2018 can be made online until 11:59 p.m. Central time, December 31st.

Exploring planned giving

We invite you to explore additional gift planning options to extend your sponsorship and support other Unbound programs while reducing federal income taxes.

Important new legislation recently signed into law permanently extends the Charitable IRA Rollover Donation into future years. This special provision of H.R. 2029 allows taxpayers age 70 ½ and older to make tax-free charitable contributions up to $100,000 per year from traditional Individual Retirement Accounts and Roth IRAs.

For those who qualify, the Charitable IRA Rollover Donation provides an excellent opportunity to utilize all or part of your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) for charitable giving. Many of our sponsors are suspending monthly donations in favor of a single annual gift from their IRA. Your donation is paid directly to Unbound from your financial institution and is not subject to federal income taxes. In addition, this gift will not appear on a Form 1099-R with other taxable distributions from your investment accounts. This is an added benefit for donors who are unable to itemize deductions or include charitable contributions on their individual income tax return.

Please contact us directly if you have questions, need additional assistance or would like to request specific information. There is no obligation, and any information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.

  • Giving non-cash assets

    Funding immediate needs

    Your donation of marketable securities is available for the immediate needs of our Unbound community and qualifies as a charitable deduction for federal tax purposes.

    Gifts of stocks, bonds and mutual funds

    Personal investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, government securities and money market funds may be donated via DTC transfer to Unbound. Marketable securities are valued at the average market price as of the transfer date and may also be included as a bequest to Unbound in your will or trust.

    A charitable gift of securities held for more than one year that has increased in value may be donated with tax-favored benefits. Current tax laws allow you to deduct the fair market value of the securities as of the transfer date, and pay no tax on the appreciated gain.

    For securities that have decreased in value, you may prefer to sell the securities and claim the loss for income tax purposes. The cash proceeds can then be donated to Unbound for a charitable deduction.

    When planning a gift of marketable securities, it is important to notify Unbound in advance of your donation. This will allow us to document the intended use of the gift value and alert our broker regarding the pending transfer. When the transfer is complete, we will acknowledge your donation with the gift valuation as of the transfer date. The how-to documents included below provide specific instructions for transferring stocks and mutual funds. For all other securities, please contact us.

    Download PDF   How to transfer shares of stock to Unbound

    Download PDF   How to transfer mutual fund shares to Unbound

    Gifts of real estate and personal property

    Many sponsors and donors express a desire to do more in support of their sponsored friend or the work at Unbound, but more valuable assets they own aren’t liquid or readily marketable. This is certainly the case with real estate such as a home, farm or ranch, and commercial property. This also includes other valuable personal assets like jewelry, automobiles, boats, fine art, and collectibles.

    While we are open to all good-faith offers, each potential gift will be evaluated prior to acceptance based on need, liquidation value and other factors.

    Please note, we do not accept in-kind donations unless those items can be liquidated or put to immediate use.

    For questions regarding gifts of real estate and personal property, please contact us.

  • Giving to Unbound through your estate

    Legacy gifts — life insurance, wills, trusts and retirement accounts

    Estate or legacy gifts are contributions to a designated charity that become effective after the donor's death. No other planned gift is as simple to implement or as easy to change. You, the donor, maintain use and control of assets and financial resources during your lifetime for as long as you need them, and the charitable transfer occurs at death.

    Life insurance

    Naming Unbound as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy can provide a lasting gift with no current out of pocket cost. The transfer ownership of ownership and beneficiary designation to Unbound of a paid-up policy you no longer need, in most instances, will qualify as a charitable deduction for tax purposes. Likewise, Unbound can also be named as the owner and/or beneficiary of a new or existing policy.

    If you require additional information about naming Unbound as beneficiary of a life insurance policy, please contact us. If you choose to include Unbound in your estate plan, please notify us. Your courtesy notification will allow us to express our gratitude and update our files with the intended use of your donation.

    Download PDF    How to make a charitable gift with life insurance


    Wills and trusts

    Plan now and create a lasting legacy through your will or trust. Naming Unbound as a beneficiary in your estate plan costs nothing during your lifetime. However, the long-term funding it will provide later can be a transformational gift that ensures your care and concern for Unbound families will continue. Your gift can also create a lasting impact for someone you genuinely care about, namely, your sponsored friend.

    Sample bequest language and other information regarding estate gifts is available in the link below. This language may be easily adapted to provide ongoing benefits for your sponsored friend and support the ongoing work of Unbound.

    If you have questions or require additional assistance regarding legacy gifts to Unbound in your will or trust, please contact us. If you choose to include Unbound in your estate plan, please notify us. Your courtesy notification will allow us to express our gratitude and update our files with the intended use of your donation.

    Download PDF   How to include Unbound in your will or trust


    Retirement accounts

    Important new legislation recently signed into law permanently extends the Charitable IRA Rollover Donation into future years. This special provision of H.R. 2029 allows taxpayers age 70 ½ and older to make tax-free charitable contributions up to $100,000 per year from traditional Individual Retirement Accounts and Roth IRAs.

    For those who qualify, the Charitable IRA Rollover Donation provides an excellent opportunity to utilize all or part of your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) for charitable giving. Many of our sponsors are suspending monthly donations in favor of a single annual gift from their IRA. Your donation is paid directly to Unbound from your financial institution and is not subject to federal income taxes. In addition, this gift will not appear on a Form 1099-R with other taxable distributions from your investment accounts. This is an added benefit for donors who are unable to itemize deductions or include charitable contributions on their individual income tax return.

    In addition, naming Unbound as beneficiary of your retirement plan or investment account can provide ongoing support for your sponsored friend and help continue our work with families living in poverty. You may be surprised to learn that assets accumulated in your qualified retirement account such as an IRA, 401(k), 403(b), Keogh, deferred annuity and other tax-deferred investments can be among the most heavily-taxed assets in your estate.

    These assets are accumulated primarily on a pre-tax and/or tax-deferred basis. The naming of anyone other than a spouse and/or qualifying charity as beneficiary will create a significant tax liability for other family members and loved ones.

    A better option may be to name Unbound as a beneficiary of your retirement plan and designate other non-qualified assets from your estate as gifts to your heirs. This eliminates the income tax burden on the percentage share of retirement account assets not assigned to Unbound, and it may provide a potential charitable estate tax deduction to your heirs on the full value of your gift.

    If you have questions or need additional information regarding the assignment of your retirement plan assets, please contact us. If you choose to include Unbound in your estate plan, please notify us. Your courtesy notification will allow us to express our gratitude and update our files with the intended use of your donation.

    Download PDF   How to give from your retirement account(s) and other tax-deferred investments

  • Gifts that give back

    Charitable gift annuity - a significant gift to Unbound and life income for you

    A charitable gift annuity is a relatively simple contract between you and Unbound. In exchange for donated assets valued of $10,000 or more, you will receive a partial charitable deduction and guaranteed income for a specified period or your lifetime. A portion of each income payment made to you by Unbound is considered a partial return of your gift and is non-taxable.

    Your annuity contract may also be designated to benefit another person such as a spouse or other family member. Annuitants (also known as beneficiaries) must be 60 years or older to begin receiving benefits.

    Try our online gift planning calculator for a personalized illustration.

    A minimum transfer of $10,000 or more in cash, marketable securities or other designated assets (approved in advance by Unbound) is required to fund a charitable gift annuity. It should be noted that once the transfer is complete, your gift is irrevocable and cannot be returned.

    An illustration

    Example of how a gift annuity works

    How it works

    1. You transfer cash, securities or other property to Unbound.
    2. You receive a charitable deduction, potential tax savings on capital gains, and fixed income each year to you and/or another family member for a specified period or your lifetime. Typically, a portion of each payment is tax free.
    3. When the annuity payments end, the remaining principal is available to Unbound.

    Deferred charitable gift annuity option

    For donors who don’t need immediate income from their gift, a deferred charitable gift annuity allows you to decide when payments will begin.

    The longer you delay or defer receiving your annuity payments, the higher the payout rate and income available to you. In addition, the higher appreciated value of your gift will result in a larger charitable tax deduction in the year the gift is annuitized and you begin receiving payments.

    Download PDF Charitable gift annuity - sample illustrations





    Charitable remainder trust - income to you now, a gift for Unbound later

    A charitable remainder trust requires a formal trust agreement prepared by an attorney or financial institution. It allows you as donor to transfer a current gift of cash, marketable securities, property or other assets to a third-party trustee for the future benefit of a designated charity, such as Unbound. Under the terms of the trust agreement, you may continue to use the property and/or receive income from the gift for a specified period or your life, at which time Unbound would receive the remainder or residual portion of the trust assets.

    Try our online gift planning calculator for a personalized illustration.

    Your contribution to the trust is irrevocable and the assets cannot be returned once transferred. However, you do retain the right to change the designated charity and may have some control over investment decisions. This planning strategy allows you to avoid any capital gains tax on the donated assets, and also receive an income tax deduction for the fair market value of the unused portion transferred by the trust to the charity. In addition, the donated assets are removed from your estate thereby reducing subsequent estate taxes to your heirs.

    An illustration

    Example of how a remainder trust works

    How it works

    1. You transfer cash, securities or other property to a third-party trustee.

    2. You receive an income tax deduction and pay no capital gains tax on appreciated assets. During its term, the trust pays a fixed amount or percentage of its value to you or anyone you name.

    3. When the trust is terminated, the remaining principal is transferred to Unbound.

    More information is available by contacting us or by selecting the links below.

    Should you choose to include Unbound in your estate plan, please contact us with the details. Your courtesy notification will allow us to express our gratitude, and to update our files with the intended use of your gift.

    Download PDF Charitable remainder trusts - sample illustrations

    Download PDF Charitable gift annuity or charitable remainder trust - which is right for you? 





    Charitable lead trust - income to Unbound now, a gift later for your heirs

    A charitable lead trust also requires a formal trust agreement prepared by an attorney or financial institution. The trust can be created during your lifetime or under your will. It reverses the income payment pattern common to life income gifts. A designated charity like Unbound takes the “lead” because the trust makes payments to the charity first, then returns the remaining assets to you, your family or others you may designate.

    Under the terms of the trust agreement, you or your estate transfers a gift of cash, marketable securities, property or other assets to a third-party trustee for the current benefit of Unbound. The trust manages the assets and Unbound receives income from the gift for a specified period or your life, at which time the remainder or residual portion of the trust assets would revert to you or your heirs.

    The asset value is fixed, for gift tax purposes, at the time the trust is established and any subsequent increase in the value of the assets will pass to your heirs free of estate and gift tax. It is an attractive gift vehicle for appreciating assets you wish to pass intact to the next generation.

    An illustration

    Example of how a remainder trust works 

    How it works

    1. You or your estate transfers cash, securities or other property to a third-party trustee. Asset values are fixed for gift tax purposes. Transfers during your lifetime may qualify for an income tax deduction.

    2. The trust pays an annual fixed amount or percentage of its value to Unbound during the “lead” term.

    3. When the trust is terminated, the remaining principal is transferred to you or your heirs. Any subsequent increase in value will pass to remainder beneficiaries free of estate and gift taxes.

    More information is available by contacting us or by selecting the links below.

    Should you choose to include Unbound in your estate plan, please contact us with the details. Your courtesy notification will allow us to express our gratitude, and to update our files with the intended use of your gift.

  • Resource library

Gift calculator

We invite you to explore a variety of gift options privately by entering your basic information and the amount of your gift commitment. This interactive gift planning calculator provides you with an additional tool to evaluate your various options.

Gift options explained

Gift annuity
In exchange for your gift to charity, you or one to two other annuitants receive a fixed sum each year for life.

Deferred gift annuity
In exchange for your gift to charity, you or one to two other annuitants receive a fixed sum each year for life starting at the date of first payout.

 

 

Unbound is a 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation, federal EIN: 43-1243999. Contributions are tax-deductible as allowed by law, unless otherwise noted.

This page provides general information about gift planning and is not intended to provide individual financial, legal, or tax information or advice. Unbound recommends that you speak with a tax adviser, financial adviser or attorney about how to make charitable giving part of your overall financial plan.